I’ve been saving Frodo’s T-Shirt’s for years with the intention of making a tshirt quilt. I read tons of tutorials, gathered all of my supplies and a few months ago finally decided to dive in!

IMG_2994I started by placing my template over each t-shirt to see which ones would be too big (the design would get cut off) and which were too small (would include the seams) and eliminated both. Once I found which designs fit perfectly for the size I wanted, I began cutting them out with a rotary cutter, using the whole tshirt so that the back of the tshirt could be the back of my quilt.

IMG_3041I also cut out white flannel pieces with the same template and sandwiched them in between each front and back. Once I had all of my shirts cut and “sandwiches” made, I sewed an X on each one to stabilize the fabric.

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Once all of my Xs were sewn, I set out all of my squares to decide how I wanted them placed. Then I began sewing them into rows. Since this is a rag quilt I sewed “wrong” sides together, so that the seam stuck up on the right side. That’s the part that will be clipped later to achieve┬áthe “rag” look.

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My seams aren’t prefectly straight here but this kind of quilt is very forgiving, so it’s ok!

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And this is how it looks when all the rows are sewn together. One last sewing part is shown in the next photo, sewing a seam all around the edges of the whole quilt.
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After all of the sewing is done, you clip the seams each half inch or so. I didn’t get a photo of that, but below is a photo from a flannel rag quilt I did a few months ago. I’ll post that full tutorial soon!IMG_2810

#1 tip on this part is get sharp, quality scissors. Also, be careful you don’t cut all the way to the thread. I had to go back and sew up parts I accidentally cut on this one. Once that step is done, just throw in the washer and then the dryer. This helps fray the edges. T-Shirt Quilts will just kind of ruffle and won’t fray and create the puffy edges cotton or flannel rag quilts make.

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This is the finished product. The kid is very happy with it. It contains years of memories and keeps him warm at night! Now I want to make myself one!

One final bit of advice. A walking foot makes this project a bit easier so that the fabric doesn’t pull and stretch while you are sewing.